WORK ZONE SAFETY – NIGHT CONSTRUCTION WORK

Reduced visibility during night construction can increase the amount time it takes for a motorist to see and respond to work activity taking place on or near the roadway. Other factors that can affect a driver’s ability to respond effectively to night construction work activity include age, experience, mental condition, physical condition, weather and familiarity with the roadway.

Reduced visibility during night construction work can also affect an equipment operator’s ability to see and respond effectively to the activity taking place around them. It is important to follow the worker safety plan for night construction work activity which should include the following:

HIGH-VISIBILITY SAFETY APPAREL

  • ANSI Class 3 shirt or vest, as the outermost clothing. Replace these when faded, worn, dirty or defaced.
  • ANSI high-visibility gaiters or bands around the ankles.
  • Hard hat with reflective tape or work light attachment.

ANSI Class 3 apparel and high visibility gaiters place the reflective material on the arms and legs in a design that conveys biological motion (body movement). Road workers wearing biomotion clothing are recognized at significantly longer distances than the standard vest alone.

TEMPORARY WORK AREA LIGHTING

  • Light the work area and approaches to provide visibility for motorists to safely travel through the work zone.
  • Illuminate work activity areas where workers are present to make them visible.
  • Control glare so as not to interfere with the visibility of the work zone by drivers and workers.

VEHICLE LIGHTING

Ensure all lighting and supplemental lighting on construction vehicles and equipment is in good working order.

ACTIVITY WITHIN THE CONSTRUCTION SITE

Night construction activity can also create limited visibility for equipment operators and other construction vehicles.

  • Ensure back up alarms are working correctly.
  • Be aware than equipment blind spots/zones can increase during night work.
  • Use spotters when backing equipment to prevent run overs or back overs.
  • Don’t walk behind or between operating or moving equipment and vehicles.
  • Be aware of the greater chance for trips and falls while walking on the construction site.
  • Follow the temporary traffic control plan and the worker safety plan for night construction work activity.
  • Know the details of the project’s emergency action plan.

Download the printable PDF and recording form here.

NOISE EXPOSURE & HEARING PROTECTION

In the United States, hearing loss is the third most common chronic physical condition after high blood pressure and arthritis. Short-term exposure to loud noise can cause a temporary change in a person’s hearing (ears may feel stuffed up) or a ringing in your ears (tinnitus). These short-term problems may go away within a few minutes or hours after leaving the noise. But repeated exposures to loud noise can lead to permanent ringing in the ears or hearing loss. For the construction industry, OSHA tells us our noise exposure cannot exceed an average of 90 decibels (dba) over an eight-hour period (OSHA 1926.52).

COMMON CAUSES OF NOISE IN CONSTRUCTION

  • Heavy equipment like milling machines and pavers.
  • Excavators and dozers.
  • Concrete saws.
  • Chipping hammers.
  • Air hammers.
  • Hydraulic hammers.

SIGNS OF NOISE OVEREXPOSURE

  • A person must raise their voice to be heard by another person three feet away – noise is about 85 decibels (dBA).
  • A person must shout to be heard by another person three feet away – noise is about 95 decibels (dBA).
  • A person hears ringing or humming in their ears at the end of the workday.
  • A person notices temporary hearing loss at any point when leaving work.

CHOOSING THE CORRECT HEARING PROTECTION

Hearing protection is labeled with a Noise Reduction Rating (NRR). When worn correctly, the NRR tell us the amount of noise or sound reduction we can expect when wearing hearing protection. Due to changing factors such as size, worn correctly, etc., OSHA suggests reducing the NRR by 50% for a true noise reduction in the field. If you combine two types of hearing protection together, ear plugs with earmuffs, you only add an NRR of five to the higher NRR form of hearing protection.

TYPES OF HEARING PROTECTION

  • Earplugs – when worn correctly can give you the highest NRR.
  • Earmuffs – form air‐tight seal over the ear, NRR up to 30 dB; less effective when using eyewear.
  • Canal Caps – lower NRR; use pressure from a headband to hold the earplugs in place.

IMPORTANT FACTS TO REMEMBER

  • Repeated exposure to high levels of noise over long periods of time will reduce your ability to hear.
  • You may not notice a loss of hearing until a substantial loss has occurred.
  • Hearing loss is typically gradual but is irreversible.

Download a printable PDF and recording sheet here.

UTILITY KNIFE SAFETY

Hand lacerations are the most common hand injury in the workplace (63%). They are the Number 2 leading cause of work-related injury and are the most preventable. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports:

  • There are 110,000 lost-time hand injuries annually.
  • Hand injuries send more than one million workers to the emergency room each year.
  • 70% of workers who experienced hand injuries were not wearing gloves.

COMMON CAUSES OF HAND LACERATIONS WHEN USING A UTILITY KNIFE

  • Pulling the knife towards you instead of away from your body.
  • Using a dull blade. Dull blades require more pressure, increasing the potential for injury.
  • Cutting more than the knife can handle.
  • Incorrectly storing the knife with the blade extended.
  • Not wearing hand protection.
  • Not inspecting the knife before use.

CORRECT USE

  • Wear a cut-resistant glove for hand protection.
  • Draw the knife away from your body.
  • Ensure the knife is the correct tool for the task.
  • Inspect the blade to make sure it’s not damaged or dull.
  • Properly store and retract the blade.
  • Make your cut on a solid surface. Never hold an object in your lap or against any part of your body.

Some hand lacerations can be minor and only need first aid. Other hand lacerations can be severe, requiring medical attention and potentially causing nerve damage that limits hand dexterity for life

Download a printable PDF and recording form here.

Prohibited Telecommunications and Video Surveillance Equipment and Services


Source: INDOT email sent 09/01/2020: INDOT-Attention Contractors Effective Immediately

Contractors,
To the attention of all INDOT contracted service providers.

Effective Immediately

This clause will be added to all INDOT professional services and construction contracts so that INDOT will be in compliance with federal requirements:


Prohibited Telecommunications and Video Surveillance Equipment and Services.
In accordance with federal regulations (including 2 CFR 200.216 and 2 CFR 200.471), the Contractor is prohibited from purchasing, procuring, obtaining, using, or installing any telecommunication or video surveillance equipment, services, or systems produced by:
(A) Huawei Technologies Company or ZTE Corporation (or any subsidiary or affiliate of such entities), OR
(B) Hytera Communications Corporation, Hangzhou Hikvision Digital Technology Company, or Dahua Technology Company (or any subsidiary or affiliate of such entities), for any purpose to fulfill its obligations under this Contract. The Contractor shall be responsible to ensure that any subcontractors are bound by and comply with the terms of this provision. Breach of this provision shall be considered a material breach of this Contract.


BACKGROUND: On August 13, 2018, the President signed the FY 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA). Section 889(b) prohibits Federal agencies, after August 13, 2020, from obligating or expending financial assistance to obtain certain telecommunications and video surveillance services and equipment from specific producers.

On January 22,2020, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that outlined revisions to 2 CFR 200, in part, to implement section 889 of the FY 2019 NDAA. Today, the Federal Register Notice issued the Final Rule and states that the amendment to 2 CFR 200.216 is effective on August 13, 2020.

The new 2 CFR 200.471 regulation provides clarity that the telecommunications and video surveillance costs associated with 2 CFR 200.216 are unallowable for services and equipment from these specific providers. OMB’s Federal Register Notice includes the new 2 CFR 200.216 and 2 CFR 200.471 regulations.

Thank you,
Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT)
100 N. Senate Ave., IGCN
Indianapolis, IN 46204